Big Government Is Coming for Your iTunes

We all knew it was a matter of time, folks. Government tyranny has come to these shores, and we are powerless to stop it. Oh, you might think these are the ramblings of a crazy person. Well, if that’s the case, then explain THIS!

If Gov. Pat Quinn gets his way, downloading your favorite song or video may cost you more.

The governor is proposing a tax on music and movie downloads from digital services such as iTunes.

The proposal would apply the state’s 6.25 percent sales tax to digital downloads, and would add 62 cents to the cost of a $9.99 album and 94 cents to the cost of $14.99 a movie, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

Quinn is proposing the tax as a partial solution to plugging the state’s $13 billion budget hole.

DAMN YOU, ILLINOIS POLITICIANS! DAMN YOU ALL TO HELL!!!

How dare they tax our song and movie purchases? This will not stand in the United States of Flagmerica! Right?

Since 2007, 19 states have imposed similar download taxes, including Indiana, Wisconsin, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Jersey, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah and Washington, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Yes, that sounds bad, but keep in mind that those states are pretty crappy places to live (and I can say that about New Jersey with absolute authority). They have to tax iTunes purchases to keep the public’s interest in government.

So of course the anti-tax crusaders are up in arms about this one, but there’s another concern some people have with this tax.

A leading technology trade group also sounded off against the download tax, saying it would fuel music and video piracy and drive tech companies out of the state.

What a clearly ingenious move on the part of Gov. Quinn. By taxing iTunes purchases, he’s managed to piss off two important constituencies: old white people who hate taxes and anti-piracy nerds. And if there’s one idea politicians can really get behind, it’s that stealing is wrong.

Especially in Illinois, where everyone follows the law.

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